Speakers

Meet Our Speakers

Invisible
Anne Tiedemann

Anne

More information coming soon.

Anne-Marie Hill

Anne-Marie Hill

Associate Professor Anne-Marie Hill

Associate Professor Anne-Marie Hill (PhD, MSc is a research academic in the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science at Curtin University. She is an APA titled Gerontological physiotherapist (Australian Physiotherapy Association) a title awarded which recognises her expertise in Geriatrics and Gerontology. She was awarded an NHMRC early career fellowship (2012-2015) after completing her PhD in 2011 and has over 75 published or in press publications. Anne-Marie’s interests are in falls prevention, promotion of physical activity among older populations and translation of evidence into practice in health communities. She has conducted large clinical trials in both hospital and community populations and has over $8 million funding awarded. Three physiotherapists have recently been awarded their Doctorate under her primary supervision. She is now working collaboratively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers and communities focusing on sustainable physical activity programs for older Aboriginal people in WA.

Falls after hospital discharge – providing patient education

Falls are a significant problem for older people recently discharged from hospital. Functional decline, unplanned readmission, increased risk of hip fracture and other adverse events are also known to be associated with this transition period from hospital to home. Interventions to address these problems of transition from hospital to home, especially for older patients with complex needs have had mixed effects and patients themselves also report significant difficulties in managing this transition. Over the past two years a randomised controlled trial has been conducted in WA to evaluate the effect of providing older patients with tailored multimedia falls prevention education in hospital and after discharge on falls rates in the six months following hospital discharge. Results of the trial will be presented and discussed.

Daina Sturnieks

Daina Sturnieks

More information coming soon.

Joe Verghese

Joe Verghese

More information coming soon.

Lindy Clemson

Linda Clemson

Professor Lindy Clemson
Professor in Ageing & Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney
Charles Perkins Centre Active Ageing Research Node Leader
Investigator, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research

Lindy is a recognised international leader in enablement and environmental approaches to community-based falls prevention. She has led the development of three novel and successful fall prevention programs, all implemented world-wide. She has conducted nationally-funded trials to test the efficacy of interventions, including Stepping On, a group-based fall prevention program and the Lifestyle-integrated Functional Exercise (LiFE) program, and has developed assessments and interventions related to environment and behavioural fall risk. Her current work is conducting research to investigate ways to translate evidence into practice and collaborative projects to explore interventions for high-risk groups.

Her work has influenced both policy and practice, and her publications are highlighted in Cochrane Reviews, the Australian and US national fall prevention practice guidelines and in the US compendium of effective community-based falls prevention interventions. Her research expertise includes multi-methodology inquiries, intervention trials and implementation science.

She is Professor of Ageing and Occupational Therapy and an investigator on the Centre of Excellence for Population Ageing Research, the University of Sydney and an Honorary Professor at Nottingham University in the UK.

Integrated solutions for sustainable fall prevention in primary care, the iSOLVE implementation project: Lessons learnt, future directions and challenges ahead

Despite decades of research in fall prevention providing strong evidence for effective interventions in community-residing older people, there is no clear model for widespread implementation in primary care. Less than 30% of health professionals routinely screen for falls and few are asked by general practitioners or referred for intervention, leaving a huge gap of missed opportunity. The iSOLVE project has been developing and testing a package of implementation processes and change strategies in a whole of primary care approach to fall prevention. The study, which uses a blended type-2 hybrid design, is working in partnership with a primary care health network, state fall prevention leaders and fall prevention advocates. The implementation intervention includes GP educational detailing; Decision support tools and fall management tailoring; GP computer systems; Knowledge translation, education and upskilling of local allied health professionals; facilitating referral pathways, and other diffusion and dissemination strategies. Emergent findings from this multi-methodology project are providing an understanding of which active ingredients of the implementation intervention impact on success and where the future challenges are. This both informs decisions on generalisability and provides direction for future sustainability.

Invisible
Keith Hill

Keith Hill

More information coming soon.

Kim Delbaere

Kim Delbaere

More information coming soon.

Sallie Lamb

Sallie Lamb

Professor Lamb is the Director, for Centre for Statistics in Medicine and Foundation Director, Oxford Clinical Trials Research Unit (OCTRU), University of Oxford, Section Head, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Oxford, Director, Centre for Rehabilitation Research in Oxford, Deputy Director, Oxford Biomedical Research Unit, University of Oxford, Kadoorie Professor of Trauma Rehabilitation, University of Oxford and Professor of Rehabilitation, Warwick Clinical Trials Unit, University of Warwick.

She has a long standing interest in clinical trials, medical statistics and, from a clinical perspective, rehabilitation of musculo-skeletal and chronic conditions. She works with clinicians from a variety of backgrounds to develop pragmatic clinical trial designs to capture the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a variety of health technologies. She is the Chief Investigator for a number of trials of rehabilitation interventions, and Head of the Centre for Rehabilitation Research in the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculo-skeletal Sciences at the University of Oxford. Prior to taking up the post of Co-Director of OCTRU, Professor Lamb was the Foundation Director of the Warwick Clinical Trials Unit at the University of Warwick. She continues to work collaboratively with the Warwick Unit.

Professor Lamb has a particular interest in older people, and has served as a member of the American Geriatric Society/ British Geriatric Society Fall Guideline Panel, and more recently, as a member of the NICE guideline panel of hip fracture management. She collaborates with a range of US and European Investigators interested in frailty, sarcopenia and disability in older people.

Future directions for evidence based falls prevention practice

Falls prevention practice is underpinned by a large body of research evidence, which at times provides a conflicting account of effective interventions and confusion about the best way forward. Drawing on data from the first of a new generation of large pragmatic clinical trials and the 2018 updates of the Cochrane Reviews of fall prevention interventions for older people living in the community, this talk will update the evidence picture, highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the existing research base and draw conclusions for research and practice.

Terry Haines

Terry Haines

More information coming soon.

Vasi Naganathan

Vasi

Associate Professor Vasi Naganathan
Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital; Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW

Vasi Naganathan is an academic at the University of Sydney and a consultant Geriatrician at Concord Hospital in Sydney, Australia. His research interests are wide including: health of older men, oral health, falls, fractures and osteoporosis, pharmacology in the older people and the application of evidence-based medicine to older people. He has been a Chief investigator on a number of NHMRC project grants and is the chair of the Australian Scientific and Research Subcommittee.

Vasi is the Deputy Director of the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP) a longitudinal study on the health of older men.

Falls and Older Men- do we really need to think about things differently in men?

This presentation will discuss what we know about the risk factors for falls and fall related injuries and fall-related hospitalisations from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men (CHAMP) prospective cohort study of older men (n = 1705). Prior history of falls was the most significant predictor of future falls and additional risk factors for falls included age 80 years and older, being single, disability in ADLs, dementia, having 3 or more comorbidities, and reduced visual acuity in an analysis excluding history of falls. Men who were born in a non-English speaking country were at lower risk of falls when followed for 2 years. The strongest risk factor predicting fall injury hospitalisation at 10 years was dementia. A brief review of the falls prevention clinical trials will be presented with a focus on older men. Based on what we know about falls in older men we can ]have a discussion on whether there is any argument for gender specific falls assessment and management strategies.